3 Wine Initiatives You Need to Get on Board With

The Wine Press

“In 2020, the AR market stood at $3.5 billion with 1 billion AR users. This number is expected to grow exponentially, with an expected value of $18 billion in 2023.”

What technology does your business take advantage of? How far ahead are you in terms of features, initiatives and advancements? If you can’t think of any, you might want to change that.

With so much currently going on in the industry, take a look a look at some of these unique concepts that your winery could get on board with to take your business to a new level.

QR Codes

Wineries can use QR Codes as an excellent marketing tool. By adding a QR code to a bottle, you’re allowing consumers the opportunity to read more about your winery, wine club, tasting notes, or particular events. It allows you to get all your information across in a unique and specialised manner.

Many wineries, including Viña Leyda in Chile, agree that this is one of their most critical marketing tools. Additionally, this approach allows a quick glimpse at the wines’ traits, awards, and illustrations with a simple smartphone-scan.

Augmented Reality

Augmented Reality is arguably one of the most progressive advances we’ve seen regarding customer interaction using technology. In fact, several wineries have taken advantage of this technology and have potentially created a new trend in the wine world.
It works when your smartphone scans the wine label, which triggers a story-telling or video using the label. Essentially, the wine labels come to life. The best examples of this include The Walking Dead, emBRAZEN, and 19-Crimes.

Considering how crucial it is to stand out in the market, these AR labels are exactly what the industry needs. It gives wineries the opportunities to intrigue their customers uniquely and visually while taking their product to a whole new level.

While this seems like a far-fetched idea, the statistics don’t lie. In 2020, the AR market stood at $3.5 billion with 1 billion AR users. This number is expected to grow exponentially, with an expected value of $18 billion in 2023.

Radio-Frequency Identification

A Radio-Frequency Identification system (or RFID) works similar to a barcode, wherein it stores specific data about that product in a database. Essentially, the RFID is an improved version of a barcode system. With the improved version, the physical barcode does not need to be scanned. Instead, the RFID just needs to be in close proximity to the product.

Businesses can use the RFID system in a multitude of different areas. These areas include:
1. Product identification (which filters through to inventory management and even protection against counterfeiting.)
2. Employee badges (which allow for personnel tracking and restricting movement in certain areas of the business.)

Whether you’re looking to get on board with all three of these advancements or simply try one of them; it is bound to benefit your business significantly. Therefore, it is crucial for any business (especially in the wine industry) to get ahead and use technology to drive their business forward.

If you’re looking for more ways to get ahead with technology, find out more about what Troly offers small wineries and the opportunity to improve their business significantly.

Other articles you might be interested in:
5 Great Ways to Increase Restaurant Wine Sales
Lessons Learnt Selling Wine over 2020
How To Nail Your Wine Club Sale
5 Ways to Maintain Wine Sales During the Pandemic
Why Wineries Need To Up Their Social Media Game (With 4 Ways to Do That)

Original creation of our GOLD Partner Patricia
Fascinated by the many facets of wine and wine businesses, Patricia has spent years learning about wine, educating consumers about the product, as well as wineries about their business. She strives to bridge the gap between producers and consumers and help everyone to a better wine life.

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Written by Patricia at Troly
Fascinated by the many facets of wine and wine businesses, Patricia has spent years learning about wine, educating consumers about the product, as well as wineries about their business. She strives to bridge the gap between producers and consumers and help everyone to a better wine life.